pycon Posts


Finding Your Tribe or: Why You Should Join Me at DjangoCon

by phildini on June 26, 2017


“If you’re a programmer you should attend technical conferences to further your career.” Some variation of this was said to me so often when I was starting out as a writer of software that it became something like gospel. It became how I approached conferences; I was there to gain skills or a network that would help me further my career in some way, or further the interests of whoever my employer happened to be at the time. 
 
If you approach conferences with this mindset, I think you will be disappointed. I certainly was. And it took a couple years of going to conferences before I realized (with the help of my wife and some close friends, I should point out) that I had the most fun when I focused less on how any particular conference was going to further my career and focused more on making genuine connections with people, and focusing on topics I actually found exciting.
 
This makes sense to me when I step back to think about it. Writing software, even when you’re on a large project or part of a large team, can be a very lonely, isolating business. We spend most of our time in our own heads, building castles of imagination that we make real through code. Given the viral strains of imposter syndrome, burnout, and depression that runs through our industry, it can feel incredibly difficult to reach out and make connections, to share our problems and commiserate even with our closest peers.
 
This is the strength of the best conferences for me. Yes, you will learn things at a good technical conference. You will be exposed to ideas and approaches to problems (both technical and social) that you maybe hadn’t thought of before. Delighting in learning is a totally valid reason to attend technical conferences, and part of why I attend so many.
 
But the primary reason for me is finding and reconnecting with my tribe. Technical conferences, especially in the Python community, are filled with some of the best and brightest people I’ve had the fortune of knowing, and, more than that, are filled with people who are kind, and willing to listen, and also want to connect with others in their community. I will tell you a secret: Many of the best and brightest, those you might be coming to a conference specifically to see speak, are coming because they also want to make those connections. They also want to reach out, commiserate, and find their tribe.
 
Now let’s talk about DjangoCon, specifically DjangoCon US which is coming up in August. PyCon is the big conference in our community, and it draws the biggest crowds. PyCon is excellent, and I enjoy going every year. I connect with people at PyCon that I basically don’t see for the rest of the year. But where PyCon is the big yearly reunion with the whole community, and can therefore be overwhelming, DjangoCon is the smaller gathering with friends. Where PyCon is, in many ways, a week-long festival for the Python community, DjangoCon is closer to an intimate dinner party, where you can hear more of each other’s conversations, and join in some incredible discussions.
 
If you’re still searching for a tribe, or want to reconnect with the Python and Django Community, and want to do so in an intimate gathering of friends, I hope you’ll consider attending DjangoCon this year. As an added bonus, you’ll get to hear myself and the other speakers give a frankly incredible lineup of talks. Seriously, I get excited just looking at it. 
 
Now, some people might be turned off by the fact that the conference is in Spokane. It’s a little out of the way, this is true, but this is one of the reasons I get excited about conferences: Chances to visit places I wouldn’t visit otherwise. I’ll also say that the best breakfast I ever had was in a small town in Washington, and I’m excited for the brunch game in Spokane.
 
If you’re still not sure that DjangoCon is where you’ll find your tribe, I direct you to the opening talk: “The Shy Person’s Guide to Tech Conferences”. DjangoCon is here for you, and we can’t wait to meet you. 
 
Hope to see you in Spokane.
 
P.S. About that “technical conferences will further your career” thing. Nothing has done more for my career, and my well-being as human, as having a collection of real friends that I’ve met at conferences.
 



WordFugue is an independent collection of writings and ramblings, and we’ll never show you ads. If you want to support our work, consider donating to Philip’s Patreon, or buy a book from our Amazon affiliate store. In the spirit of DjangoCon, consider purchasing Two Scoops of Django, our favorite Django book.
 


Working to Ensure the Future of the Python Community

by phildini on May 25, 2017


I'm entering the arena for the third year. I'm running to be a Director for the Python Software Foundation. This post will help explain why.

There's an argument that anything I write here should instead be in my candidate statement. I don't disagree, and the reason I'm writing here instead of there relates to one of the things I'd like to change: Nominating for the Board of Directors requires editing the Python Wiki. The Python Wiki is hard to use, the documentation on it is not well-exposed, and a room full of Pythonistas during the PyCon sprints (including one current Board member) couldn't tell me who maintains it. Beyond that, you have to answer somewhat-esoteric Python trivia to submit your edits.

I'd like a clear definition of what the Board and the community thinks the Wiki is for, and regular check-ins on whether it's serving the community well. I'd like to see us running "PSF Sprints", where Board members or anyone else interested is writing documentation about how the PSF is run. Our election processes and funding processes and budget processes and outreach processes should be checked on regularly, and I'll be pushing for more transparency and openness about how we run the business side of Python.

Speaking of outreach, I'd like the PSF to be doing more of it, and funding groups who are growing the Python community. There will be more about this in a future post, because I have plans on how to get our community of Pythonistas back out into the world growing the community at universities and hackathons and incubators and corporations. I want every group and individual trying to grow Python to know that the PSF has their back, and will put money behind them. 

I also want to be on the Board to remind the PSF that they have power beyond grant giving. Yes, the majority of what the PSF Board has done in recent years has been giving grants to organizations around the world. That work is excellent, and I want to see it increase. But the PSF is also in a unique position to be a promotion clearing house and force multiplier for good ideas in the community. When good learning materials are written, they should be easily findable from the official Python websites. When Python events are being held, the PSF should be a cheerleader, spreading the word about what's happening in the community.

These are the things I plan to do as a PSF Director to help grow Python. I haven't even gotten into the investment I want to see us putting into our core tools and platform infrastructure; that will have to be another post and my brain is a little fried from PyCon. 

So the only question left is: Why do I need to be on the Board to do these things? And the answer is I don't These are things I'm going to push for no matter what. But the PSF is in many ways the voice of the community, and I want to see that voice brought to bear on the issues that will be affecting our community for the next year and the next decade. I think I can help use that voice to speak for the Pythonistas of the future, and I hope you agree.


Thoughts on PyCon 2017, Day 1

by phildini on May 19, 2017


Here we are the end of the first conference day of PyCon. Thinking over the day, and including thoughts from the opening reception last night, I'm struck by something that is even more true this year than it was last year:

The Python community is incredible. We are at an inflection point where we need to be making measured, conscious decisions to keep Python and its community thriving. 

I'm going to be writing even more about this in the coming weeks, but let me jot down some observations, and then try to sum them up at the end:

1. It was pretty obvious to anyone who had been here last year that there were less sponsor booths in the expo hall. Noticeably less. Speaking to someone who had a booth last year and chose not to this year, there was perhaps a level if disgruntledness with the organizers that caused them to skip this year. That's troubling. What's even more troubling is talking to conference organizers for other Python and Django conferences about how it's gotten harder this year to find sponsors.

2. Jake VanderPlas' keynote this morning highlighted some areas where Python is making incredible inroads, and showcased how Python is becoming the defacto tool in many areas of the science community. They choose Python for many reasons, and one of them is:

 

 

Or, to put it more succintly:

 

These thoughts really resonated with the audience, based on the number of likes and retweets I got. And I think these are sentiments the community at large shares. We don't (necessarily) choose Python because it's the fastest language on the planet. We choose it because we like working in the language and we love the community that comes with it.

3. Speaking of that community, I didn't get a chance to see as many of the talks as I would like, because I spent so much time chatting with people about fascinating topics in the hallway track. The hallway track continues to be one of the best parts of PyCon, and it was especially noticeable this year that people were being encouraged to participate. One of the amazing things about PyCon is that all the talks are recorded and put online for free, sometimes within hours of their being given, so attending a talk can often be considered secondary to meeting interesting people in the hallway.

4. This is even more pure anecdote than (3), but it felt like I heard of more people finding it harder to get jobs in Python building web applications, and easier in things like data or science. I can't prove this is true, and it might not be all bad, but it's something to watch. Any area where it's suddenly harder to find work in Python means a pillar of our community is weakening, and we should be aware of it.

5. The day ended with lightning talks, and I hope everyone in the audience saw Cameron Dershem's talk about what the Rust community is doing better than the Python community, especially when it comes to improving usability of the language and making it easier to contribute. Furthermore, I hope it was a call to arms for all of us to start pushing for making every aspect of our community feel welcoming, and like new people can make a difference.

Summing up: Python's community still feels like home, to me and many others, and PyCon feels like a homecoming. If we want to make sure the community continues to be incredible, we need to keep an eye on trends in where people and companies are using PyCon. We also need to continue to be excellent to each other, whether the person we're talking to has been here for years or just learned about Python today.

I'm going to keep pushing to make Python better, and I look forward to seeing you all at PyCon tomorrow.