Thoughts on PyCon 2017, Day 1

by phildini on May 19, 2017


Here we are the end of the first conference day of PyCon. Thinking over the day, and including thoughts from the opening reception last night, I'm struck by something that is even more true this year than it was last year:

The Python community is incredible. We are at an inflection point where we need to be making measured, conscious decisions to keep Python and its community thriving. 

I'm going to be writing even more about this in the coming weeks, but let me jot down some observations, and then try to sum them up at the end:

1. It was pretty obvious to anyone who had been here last year that there were less sponsor booths in the expo hall. Noticeably less. Speaking to someone who had a booth last year and chose not to this year, there was perhaps a level if disgruntledness with the organizers that caused them to skip this year. That's troubling. What's even more troubling is talking to conference organizers for other Python and Django conferences about how it's gotten harder this year to find sponsors.

2. Jake VanderPlas' keynote this morning highlighted some areas where Python is making incredible inroads, and showcased how Python is becoming the defacto tool in many areas of the science community. They choose Python for many reasons, and one of them is:

 

 

Or, to put it more succintly:

 

These thoughts really resonated with the audience, based on the number of likes and retweets I got. And I think these are sentiments the community at large shares. We don't (necessarily) choose Python because it's the fastest language on the planet. We choose it because we like working in the language and we love the community that comes with it.

3. Speaking of that community, I didn't get a chance to see as many of the talks as I would like, because I spent so much time chatting with people about fascinating topics in the hallway track. The hallway track continues to be one of the best parts of PyCon, and it was especially noticeable this year that people were being encouraged to participate. One of the amazing things about PyCon is that all the talks are recorded and put online for free, sometimes within hours of their being given, so attending a talk can often be considered secondary to meeting interesting people in the hallway.

4. This is even more pure anecdote than (3), but it felt like I heard of more people finding it harder to get jobs in Python building web applications, and easier in things like data or science. I can't prove this is true, and it might not be all bad, but it's something to watch. Any area where it's suddenly harder to find work in Python means a pillar of our community is weakening, and we should be aware of it.

5. The day ended with lightning talks, and I hope everyone in the audience saw Cameron Dershem's talk about what the Rust community is doing better than the Python community, especially when it comes to improving usability of the language and making it easier to contribute. Furthermore, I hope it was a call to arms for all of us to start pushing for making every aspect of our community feel welcoming, and like new people can make a difference.

Summing up: Python's community still feels like home, to me and many others, and PyCon feels like a homecoming. If we want to make sure the community continues to be incredible, we need to keep an eye on trends in where people and companies are using PyCon. We also need to continue to be excellent to each other, whether the person we're talking to has been here for years or just learned about Python today.

I'm going to keep pushing to make Python better, and I look forward to seeing you all at PyCon tomorrow.